You Never Know Where Your Career Will Take You

Career Business Passion

Luis Lequerica:

The biggest difference in between, a property investor and an owner-occupier or a family home buy is that emotional component. I really believe that what we bring to the table, not only as buyer’s agents but as your aim part is bringing that financial model, into the decision making process.

Ben Handler:

Welcome to the Buyer’s Agent Institute Show. The purpose of the show is to bring awareness to buyers agents to bring awareness to the career opportunities that buyer’s agents are providing to people to bring awareness to the opportunities around the value that buyers agents are providing to people who need help buying property. Our goal of the show is to strip back and dive into the stories and the journeys of remarkable buyers agents who are paving the way forward in one of the fastest-growing we real estate career trends right now. Our guest today is Luis Lequerica. He was born in South America. He’s got a remarkable entrepreneurial story. Luis moved from South America to Australia and studied agricultural economics. He had the intention of getting into the family business. He then had a bit of a pivot and got into the Rose business. He grew a seven and eight-figure Rose business, not just in Australia, but internationally. Then after that Rose business, when he exited, he got into real estate and became a buyer’s agent. He’s now a director of Your Empire. He started off working with investor clients and now he’s transitioned into working with owner-occupiers. We’re going to dive into Luis, his story and we’re going to introduce Luis right now.

Welcome Luis.

Luis Lequerica:

Ben, thank you for having me. I don’t know if I’m remarkable, but it’s, it’s actually very cool to be here today, so thank you so much.

Ben Handler:

Awesome, man. You’ve got to re, I think you’ve got a really remarkable story. I mean, I heard a story, I haven’t unpacked this with you around, there was a lot of roses on a plane once and then the plane arrived and let’s just say the roses weren’t in the best condition.

Luis Lequerica:

condition. Yeah. So let’s, let’s say we went down in flames, on that one and look, it was a great lesson, so one of the things that we learned out of that always had insurance and always make sure that your insurance is actually valid insurance. So as we found out, our freight forwarder was selling us d**  insurances. So we lost, quite a bit of money there and we had to liquidate the business.

 

Ben Handler:

Wow. And so how did you go and get into this Rose business? I mean, it’s quite a unique area.

Luis Lequerica:

Yeah. Look, interestingly enough, as you said, I was studying agricultural economics and as part of our marketing ops research, we had to do a, a marketing project on an agricultural product. And I decided to do it on roses out of Columbia. So I was doing all the market research. I realized that there was no, fine fresh cut flowers in Australia. The market was very seasonal and I thought there was a great opportunity to get into that business at that point. And I started with one little box at a time. I used to get the bus from one end of Oxford Street to the other end sale bunches of roses to each one of those flower shops. And the business started growing from there.

 

Ben Handler:

Amazing. I mean it seems like you’ve got the Entrepreneurial blood. How then did you then pivot from the Rose business into real estate?

Luis Lequerica:

So, when I started the flower business, I became a member of an organization, which is a worldwide organization called entrepreneurs organization, so I became a member of that when I was 24 years old. And back there I met my current business partner, Chris Gray. And , look through our, I was part of EO for maybe 12 years or 10 years. And throughout their journey, just Chris and I became really good friends. And when I liquidated the flower business, I was looking for other things to do. I actually ventured into a subscription business for kids, which was backed by Telstra and I actually stepped down from that, from that business as well because I wasn’t passionate about it. And at that point I thought, well, I should get into something different. And I had an idea around real estate. I sat down with Chris, had a coffee, the coffee ended up being 10 beers.

, look to these days, our, shareholder’s agreement is in the back of a serviette. So, five points, very easy to remember and it has been a remarkable, partnership.

 

Ben Handler:

Yeah. So obviously a lot of trusts there and you’re doing a shareholder’s agreement on the back of the serviette. No, it’s great. It just seems like you guys have very high-level trust. How important has EO been during your, your business career?

Luis Lequerica:

Oh, massive. Massive look. I, I always say, EO has saved my life, my business career and my marriage more than once. So from a personal perspective, just being able to share with that level of, of people, just entrepreneurs, business owners, so in order for you to qualify into, we owe, you have to, be the business owner, have a revenue of more than $1 million to apply globally for Sydney, it’s $5 million revenue.

And then, so everyone is going through a very similar journey. So being able to feed on those experiences, it’s just amazing. It’s, it’s having, I always explain it. Imagine having, 8 board members that you can access once a month for four hours or at any given point that touch of your fingers. So it’s actually amazing.

 

Ben Handler:

Yeah. I mean that’s, support is what you need when you’re grinding as an entrepreneur. People who like-minded people, you can bounce things off.

 

Luis Lequerica:

Yeah. And look and being able to share the experiences as well, we all know that the entrepreneurial journey is not an easy one. It’s a tough journey. It’s a roller coaster and you sometimes need to vent. You need to, understand why the fuck things are happening, and, and there’s no better way to do it.

 

Ben Handler:

And then how have you found this new transition? Obviously, you’re focusing on investor clients for a while that Your Empire and now you’ve moved into the primary residence space. How’s that transition?

Luis Lequerica:

Look? It, it, it’s, it’s a very interesting process because I, I always said to, to Chris and to everyone in the business, I actually don’t want to be a buyer’s agent, so I don’t consider myself a bias. Agents are such, my angle is more on the business angle. And look, it’s, it’s a very important thing to, to clarify because for the people that are doing the course, for example, these, besides being a buyer’s agents, you’re also going to be a business owner, and that’s a massive thing that you’ve got to sort of getting into it. So, for me, my focus is I want to be 30% buyer’s agents, 70% business owner, and look, people can do it differently, but for me, that’s, that’s what I want. So, so when we started, four or five years ago with Your Empire, we had one product.

We have tripled the size of the business nearly, and we now have close to eight products, right? So for me, it’s been a very challenging thing. How to learn a new industry on the go, grow the business, I am absolutely passionate about property, which I never thought it was going to happen, more than anything. You know what I mean? I, I think it is being passionate about people and being, being real, right. I, I think, again, people are sick and tired of all the bullshit around there, and people just want people, they want to relate to another human being, so for me it’s been a massive learning curve.

 

Ben Handler:

Yeah. People want authenticity and I agree about the business. Buying property is just something we have to do as buyer’s agents. I mean, this is, that’s the service and we’ve got to deliver it 120%. Yeah. But we are in the business of running a business.

Luis Lequerica:

That is it. That is it. Look, I, I often get this, Lifework balance questions, I mean, you, you know, I’m a, I’m a workaholic, so I work seven days a week, I’m replying emails at four o’clock in the morning, 10, 11, 12 o’clock at night, if I’ve got something in my to-do list, so for example, I won’t leave a client reply for the next day. If I have to give client updates, I will do all my clients are updates on that day. Right? So for me, it’s being able to be connected all day, every day, but also gives me the flexibility off if I want to do something on my personal or, or have personal space. It also gives me that flexibility. Yes, it’s a great way for you to enjoy life as well. Right? So, I do enjoy, certain things in life. So I like boats. I like cars even though I don’t drive, but those are the things that I enjoy.

 

Ben Handler:

You mentioned you don’t drive. How do you get around to client appointments? I’m just curious without, without driving.

Luis Lequerica:

So, look, I do public transport, so I take the bus trains, I do a lot of Uber, for, for the weekend viewings. I normally rent a car, but I just believe that there are other ways, for you to get from point a to B and you don’t necessarily need to own a car, look, we’re a family of five, so I’ve got three kids. We have a car at home, but, but I normally don’t use it, I really try and make an effort and, and, and use public transport. So, you don’t like driving, or you just look, I, I had my license, I lost my license and it was, it was an interesting process because I used to drive everywhere. I mean, at one point I think I had like four or five cars at home and I, I literally drove everywhere and this just forced me to think outside the box, I’m probably more productive now. So on the bus, on the train, in an Uber, I can read emails, I can reply to emails, I can read documents, I like reading a lot. So, yeah, it’s just, it’s easier for me. It’s, I guess it, one of the things that I’ve always wanted to do is live my life by design. And this is just the way that I want to live my life.

 

Ben Handler:

It’s great. I mean, I respect that because driving is frustrating. It’s, it’s challenging on the road at times. So just being able to sit back as you said, and read and actually educate yourself instead of while you’re driving and focusing is a win.

 

Luis Lequerica:

I look, don’t get me wrong, last year we had a family holiday in New Zealand for six weeks and we drove seven and a half thousand kilometres, or I drove seven and a half thousand kilometres. So I do think that, it’s just what you want to do and how you want to do it and just, just live, live in your terms. So that’s, that’s absolutely the way that I’ve, that I’ve planned it.

 

Ben Handler:

I know that you’re working with primary residence clients mainly now as opposed to investors. How have you, what have you noticed a major difference with the, with the client journey that you’re going through?

 

Luis Lequerica:

Yeah, so, look, I’m an economist so I’m very black and white numbers-driven, sort of, sort of thing. Even though I’m South American and I’m very emotional, the biggest difference in between, a property investor and an owner-occupier or a family home buy is that emotional component. I really believe that what we bring to the table, not only as buyer’s agents but as your aim part, is bringing that financial model, into the decision-making process. So if you’re looking at, let’s call it a million-dollar property or a $5 million, there’s a financial decision, there’s a financial process, and, and, and thought process for you to understand and justify that purchase. And then there’s an emotional component. So if it’s the perfect location, the perfect house, if it’s going to make your partner happy, if it’s going to be close to schools, if it’s going to be close to the office, if it’s going to suit your lifestyle and on paper in value, it’s worth $5 million, but the vendor wants five-point $5 million.

Are you going to risk trying to get that same place in six months’ time and pay $5 million? Or are you going to put it into our $500,000 emotional component if you can live in it for the next 20 years? So is $500,000 for 10% or whatever, the amount is significant if that’s going to be yours forever home. So I think going through that motion with clients is very helpful. So understanding where they are and how can we justify it. Then emotional components.

Ben Handler:

Yeah, it’s a very different experience. A lot more emotion that you’re dealing with. But I invest in properties, I always say declines. It’s still emotional when you’re buying for investors. Yeah. They’re trying to accumulate wealth, their financial freedom, whatever they’re trying to do with this. There’s a motion with that.

 

Luis Lequerica:

Absolutely. And, and, and look, I, I always say it’s, it’s very interesting to work with, with investor clients as well. So normally COO, CFO, COO, bankers, lawyers, doctors. So normally very strong characters that we, that we’re dealing with. Very, very cool people, but strong characters, very successful people in their own sort of way, a lot of them, especially, I see this with a male, clients, they, they, they really think they’re the decision making, guys, they’re the guys that, you know, almost the wives report to them. And it’s very funny because we would present a property to them and I’ve got to, “I’ve got to check with Mary. I’ll run it past Mary first and then I’ll let you know.” So, I always like to say they wear the pants, but they bloody asked the wife every day what colour pants.

 

Ben Handler:

Then there’s this, there’s, there’s usually multiple decision-makers.

 

Luis Lequerica:

Absolutely. [inaudible] look, that’s, that’s another thing that I’ve always, or that I’ve learned it’s always communicating with both decision-makers. If you want your life to be easier, especially in the, in the family homes, if you are not talking to both decision-makers, it’s, it’s got to go pay shape one way or another.

 

Ben Handler:

Yeah, it’s great. And where can people find you?  with Your Empire? They’re looking for you guys.

 

Luis Lequerica:

So, look, the the the easiest way is to pick up the phone. Give me a ring, my number is 0456 556 052. As I said, available 24/7 will shoot me an email.

[email protected]

 

Ben Handler:

Well, it’s great to see that your empire is now expanding into the primary residence space because I mean Your Empire, it’s a very established brand. Obviously Chris and yourself, we’ve got a very good presence. So it’s great to say that you guys are diversifying and you’ve got all these products that you’re offering. I mean, I love seeing entrepreneurs who have been in business who are now getting into the buyer’s agent space, who love business. They’re hustling. There are so many transferable skills, right? Just to really bring into it. So it’s awesome to see your story. I mean, you’ve been such a successful entrepreneur, so now to bring that energy into this new business. I know you’ve been doing it for a while, but it’s just great to see how this business is expanding now. So yeah, thanks for being here. Appreciate it.

 

Luis Lequerica:

Thank you so much for having me. And I’m looking forward to another five 10, 20,30 years. Yeah.

 

Ben Handler:

And we’ll see you next week on the new show. See you there. Thank you, guys.

 

Watch Full Episode Here:

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

How To Balance “Working From Home” and Home Life

Working From Home

The lines have been blurred as we all try to work out the best ways to live and work at home.  

 It’s hard to get the right work/life balance because you don’t want to turn into a work-a-holic, and you know that despite the way you feel about life right now… you can’t binge on Netflix all day.  

 But when our workplace is forced into our homes, we need to make sure we don’t let it take over every part of our day.  

 I mean, in the workplace, we’re told to leave our personal lives at home. But it doesn’t look like the same deal applies to work staying in the workplace.  

 Let’s be honest, though, the work-creep isn’t a new thing. It’s been happening for a long time now. So, we can’t blame our current situation for any of it.  

 I believe it all started when we allowed emails on our personal computers and smartphones. 

Because when that happened… 

  • We instantly became more contactable 24/7 
  • It became too easy to take work home with us.  

And the worst part is, we allowed the intrusion because we thought it would never hurt us to answer an email or two. But as we all know, it’s never just a few emails. It’s always way more than that. And before you know it, a few hours can eat into your home time.  

 So, what’s the best way to have a healthy work/life balance? 

 Here are a few things that can help get the balance right… 

  1. Exercise is a must-do, not a might do: I have a routine I do every morning, and I never miss it, no matter how busy I am. It’s time I do yoga and meditate. I know that when I set up my day like this, I’m way more productive.
  2. Know your best times: If you’re a morning person, do more demanding work in the morning. Whereas, if you’re a night person, leave that kind of work until later in the day.
  3. Be realistic about what you can achieve: Setting realistic expectations is essential. Work tasks will always leak into home time if you overestimate or overcommit to what you can do in a day. 
  4. Use technology wisely: Technology is supposed to make our lives easier, not harder. So, keep control of your technology. Don’t take work-related calls, and don’t check your work emails after hours. Most workplaces are strict on not allowing social media during work hours… it’s high time we reverse those rules for our home life.  
  5. Do something you love: Have an interest beyond work that you love so much that you won’t miss out on doing it. This helps you to do a “hard stop” in your day and move on to something your passionate about. 

There can be a bit of a catch if the thing you love is actually is your career too. I know this from personal experience.  

Having my own business that I love means that I spend most of my day doing what I love. But even so, I still make time for myself. Because I know that if I’m not at my best, my business isn’t either.  

That’s the fun of being a business owner and being your own boss. You can set your own hours and work to your strengths. And when you do that, there’s more of a harmonious flow between work and home life.  

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Use Passion As The GPS For Your Career

Passion and Career

Sanjeev Sah:

So and at times you wear different hats, sometimes have to manage the team. Sometimes you do the product development, sometimes tests. That was the thing. So similar thing I see it’s in the same here in the as property by region like you understand you need to understand the brief, what the client is looking for and go and do the search to all the research for them and pretty much solve the client in their best interests.

Ben Handler:

Welcome back to the Buyer’s Agent Institute show. The purpose of the show is to bring awareness to buyers agents to bring awareness to the career opportunities that the buyer’s agent sector is providing people to bring awareness to the value that buyers agents are actually providing people who need help buying property. Our goal with the show is to really dive and strip back and learn about remarkable buyers agents who are paving the way forward in one of the fastest-growing real estate trends right now in Australia. Our guest today is Sanjeev Sah. Sanjeev has got an awesome story. He was born in India. He studied Computer Science in India and before he moved to Australia, he bought a commercial and residential property and paid it down. When he moved to Australia, he got into it. He worked in it for 14 years. He was working in a technical role and then he worked in a management role in his time in Australia with his family.

He purchased five properties. He didn’t pay those down. He used the equity in each property as a tool for leverage to keep accumulating more properties. Sanjeev is a great example of an entrepreneur who’s now gone out and started his buyer’s agent business. He carried out the buyer’s agent role part-time while he was working in his IT job so he could then transfer risk-free. Sanjeev now runs Investor’s Dream. He’s got a very successful buyer’s agent. I’m pleased to introduce Sanjeev Sah. Welcome Sanjeev.

Sanjeev Sah:

Thank you, Ben. Thanks for having me.

Ben Handler

Pleasure to have you here. I want to understand you bought property in India and you’ve also bought property here. Is there a big difference with how you negotiate and do transactions compared to India and Australia?

Sanjeev Sah:

Uh, no Ben. I don’t think I’m, it’s, it’s pretty much similar process. You look for the property based on your strategy and then, based on the strategy, look them and then go negotiate the properties and do the due diligence and you buy them.

Ben Handler :

Okay. I was wondering if there’s, I’ve been to India and I was just wondering if it was easier to get a deal across the line with a real estate agent compared to here or it was quite similar.

Sanjeev Sah:

India is a different market and each market has own challenges and little different ways of doing things. So yeah, it’s a little different but uh, overall process. Same.

 

Ben Handler:

Excellent. I love you, I mean your story is a great example of how transferable skills really are in regards to becoming a bias. As you studied computer science, you worked in it for 14 years in a technical role and a management role. How transferable have you found the skills that you’ve had into becoming a buyer’s agent?

Sanjeev Sah:

It’s pretty much transferable because what was happening as a IT consultant, I was working pretty much doing technical work plus understanding the requirement, the client and, and, helping the clients like to build the software. Right. So and at times you wear different hats sometimes to manage the team. Sometimes you do the product development sometimes test. That was a thing. So similar thing I see it’s in the same here in the, as a Property Buyer’s Agent. Like you understand you need to understand the brief, what the client is looking for and go and do the search to all the research for them and pretty much serve the client in their best interest. So, so that’s I think pretty much so it’s like a, I didn’t struggle like when I moved because I was doing the same thing in the, in my IT role anyways. Uh, now the challenge was a bit on the business side because now from coming from a nine to five job, suddenly wearing a business hat. So, but then, um, especially having joined Buyers Agent Institute and working with you guys, understanding the mindset and what is involved, I think it’s really helped me to move forward and foster actually.

Ben Handler:

Excellent. And you were working as a buyer’s agent part-time earlier this year when you’re carrying out your it job. Did you expect to quit your job so quickly to become a buyer’s agent?

Sanjeev Sah:

Uh, not really. Uh, because I was just testing the water. I would say, uh, I was passionate about the property I was doing from last four years in Australia and of course seven, eight years altogether, including India. But then they said it’s really good opportunity because her, like there are around 70,000 property agents, real estate agents, but only less than 500 buyer’s agents. So, and plus I was so passionate with the property, so I thought, okay, uh, I’ll start testing this one as a, because you see the opportunity, but then sometimes you see, Oh, is it for me? How can I grow in that? And all those questions come right. And then, um, but yeah, then started it part and realize no, it’s such a good opportunity, uh, to help other people and at the same time get rewarded for that. And that’s where, uh, very sooner I quit my job and I said that was my goal anyway.

Ben Handler:

Excellent. When you started to become a buyer’s agent part-time, how long did it take you to sign up your first client?

Sanjeev Sah:

I think my first client was in two weeks, I think two weeks. It was good. Uh, as soon as I started talking about what was happening during my property journey, I was already helping my friends. They’re like because they started seeing us and if you bought five properties in the last four days in Australia with your full-time job, hectic job and on a family, because I have a daughter and a wife also working, so they started, Oh, “how you’re doing”. And it’s all about the mindset and the education behind the scene and that’s where I was good to a person. I was helping anyway. So yeah, I think it didn’t take me much time.

Ben Handler:

You’ve obviously got a strong passion for real estate. I know you’re a keen educator with just learning information around how you can better yourself. How does it feel now to be working full time? Like living your hobby now?

Sanjeev Sah:

Oh my God. I know it literally cries every day. I would say in theory it’s a good tear because I pinch myself, Oh my God. Because I set myself like goals five years ago and not five is actually three and a half years ago to get out of the job in five years. And it all happened in three and a half years and now I’m like helping others and my clients are really grateful to me that I can help them build the portfolio and buy the right properties. So I’m living my life of dream actually.

Ben Handler:

Nice. And I’m assuming you’re not going to go back to the old corporate world 9-5 ever again?

Sanjeev Sah:

Uh, no, not really. No. I think I’m, I’m passionate about the property and um, so I’m working as a property buyer’s agent definitely on growing my company at the same time. I’m doing my own developments also. So yeah.

Ben Handler:

Your own developments in, in Australia?

Sanjeev Sah:

in Australia. So I think, um, last week only I got a once um, subdivision application approved, uh, which was one into two. Plus I’m working on another uh, subdivision which is one into three. So, so yeah, I’m doing my own property journey also.

Ben Handler:

It’s exciting and it’s a, it’s very rewarding. When you buy that property for your client, how do you feel your, I mean, how do you feel about the experience when you sign up a client and then you go through and purchase the property for them? How do you feel about that experience?

Sanjeev Sah:

It’s, it’s um, very amazing when people just are looking for that help actually. They’re desperate, like, and time-poor did not show like I see a lot of the people like forget about the time for like they don’t know what the strategy, what to buy and that is the biggest hurdle. And they’re looking at all the places and like they’re just not going anywhere. And they come and like we talk about the strategy itself. I said forget our properties. The last thing we’ll buy, but let’s have this strategy. What do you need? What’re your goals and how you’re gonna help them purchase a property because not just buying a property for in the namesake or buying a property, right. So everything we strategize and like they see the value and then the rest is like, okay, finding the right property, finding the right location, what suits their budget, uh, which aligns to their goals and they learn the due diligence and the negotiations. And definitely we close the deal. So now they feel very grateful and they think, Oh, there’s so much to learn in this industry. And the people I’m be talking who even are not that keen in the property world, they get very excited. So I feel like, Oh my God, it’s such a good industry to build and yeah. And making me more passionate every day actually.

Ben Handler:

Excellent. There’s a lot of value as you were just describing, the buyer’s agents provide through negotiation, sourcing, property due diligence, project managing, suggestions, advice, everything. Do you feel when you meet with prospective clients, they struggle sometimes to understand and see the value that we provide?

Sanjeev Sah:

Quite often actually. So a lot of people currently in the market, they don’t even understand like what you guys do. And um, so, so we explained them go by the process by process and um, yeah, so, so it’s, it’s a gap and that’s where, uh, currently the biggest hurdle is to educate them what we do. And that’s where I’m doing in my social media also. Like this is what we’re doing. And so that we are educating people. Uh, and yeah.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. I, I, feel as buyer’s agents, we’re in such a small bubble, we sometimes can feel or think or believe that everyone knows what buyer’s agents are and do, but the reality is the general public typically doesn’t know what buyer’s agents do and how we add value. So there’s a very strong intent for us to educate our prospective clients and people around us, like you just mentioned, through social media to help articulate the value we provide.

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah, very true. Yeah. I think a few people are there who have been using Buyer’s Agent in the past and they know all we have spoken to them and all those things. But even those people, they don’t know exactly the end to end thing. They know there’s a property Buyer’s Agent, some on health and all those things. But yeah, I think there is a gap in the market where we need to really educate people.

Ben Handler:

Has starting a new business obviously living your hobby, buying property. Has it changed your life?

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah, it’s, it is changed in a very good way. Um, but at the same time comes with a bit of challenge and that’s where I’m joining your community is very helping because coming from working 9-5 job wearing a business hat was different. Now it’s so, uh, again, so I think, um, the Buyer’s Agent Institute has set the good foundation for me and just guided me step by step what needs to be done. Uh, so which is very helpful and plus we, I’m learning from the whole community, right? So it’s all the good things. You get the challenges because it’s never an easy journey. Like you go and no start business and you will be successful. Right? So it’s a process. So now I’m given numbers, businesses really doing well. Now I’m working on my own system and processes. How so that I can help my clients better.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. It’s an ongoing process. Refining systems and procedures and looking at the business around how you can add more value and efficiency to the customer. From my experience, it’s, it’s an always an ongoing practice around how do you keep delivering the best first-class experience for the client and that when you’re running a business, you’ve just got to keep going back to your systems and looking at how can I refine it?

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah, that’s right. Yeah. So that’s where I’m currently focusing on because buying properties, easy part for me, I’m good at, there’s no doubt about that. But like how best I can have the right efficiency and help the clients. It’s all about the customer experience, right? So that’s what I learned in my IT also when I was managing the clients like Qantas, Westpac and all those big clients. So now it’s the same thing I’m trying to put in my business as well.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. It’s interesting what we can learn from previous careers or roles or experiences and how transferable that is. When we embark on something different and it’s great to see that when you’re in IT, you’re working with such big clients, like you know, Qantas, uh, some of the big banks and I’m sure you learn so much around communication and around customer service and project management. And it’s such an awesome opportunity to when you create a business to really inject all that skill and energy and the time that you’ve put into so many previous tasks and projects and now injected into your new business. Yeah. I always tell people that I might’ve said this when we first spoke, buying property is one of the easiest parts of the buyer’s agent role. How do you feel about that?

Sanjeev Sah:

Initially, I think I remember when he used to talk about this, I used to say, come on now we’re property buyer’s agent, how can it be? It’s all about property, right? But now I’m realizing that there’s more competent properties, one part, and he’s the easiest part, especially if you’re passionate about it. Um, but then it’s more the business and like how best you can because from, for most of the people, right? Buying a property is going to be the biggest decision and biggest purchase item and it’s a lot of emotion involved. So bringing that experience so that they always remember you and, and the whole goal is to have like, it’s not should because these are just, people are struggling. It’s a bad experience. I see for most of the people because of the hurdles, the strategy, there are so many products talking to the agents, negotiation, due diligence.

Sanjeev Sah:

So if we can bring that experience, I think it no more be like a struggle. Buying property will be fun actually. And that’s what I’m trying to bring in my business model. Like, like all my customers should feel that it’s fun because it’s, it’s, it is a great vehicle to have a passive income for myself. Also, like passionate about the property because I wanted to quit off the job. Nothing that I was, I used to love my job and I was doing good because that’s what I started. And uh, I was doing good like last 14 years at my job. But then one day I realized that it’s not helping me fit my time because I wanted to help my parents back home and those things.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. Very nice. It’s great. And moving on to my next question. You’ve obviously started your business investor’s dream. I’ve been seeing you, you’re doing a lot of purchases for your clients already, so it seems like you’re very busy. What’s the plans over the next, you know, 12 months next year for you or you just looking to keep the business the way it is? Are you looking to expand any, any plans on the horizon?

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah, no, I think I definitely, so, uh, next for next one year, my goal is to like help around 60, 70 clients. So many of them, five clients a month. Uh, because that’s what the number, I feel like I can comfortably help and then have the system and process build robust. So, and then I’ll look for hiring more people in the business so that maybe I can help more people. That’s the thing.

Ben Handler:

Great. That’s a good goal. 60 to 70 clients next year. From what I’m seeing online with all the purchases you’re doing, I’m sure you’re going to get there very easily.

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah.

Ben Handler:

And are you purchasing any properties off-market at the moment or is a lot of it on the market?

Sanjeev Sah:

Yeah, so I think, um, most of the purchases are from the market, but there are few coming real good deals off the market because of my relationship with the client. And again, property purchase is all about a relationship like properties. The last thing is like how we deal with the people and how we good with the people. And a lot of my deals come from that also, actually. So one of the recent client I posted on Facebook, it was such a good deal. And, uh, people, people, people contacted me and they ask where it is and all those things. Of course, I’m not gonna share the location and all, but because it’s all about my client privacy, but they saying, ah, maybe it’s, uh, uh, just, uh, uh, not possible and those kinds of things. So I said, no, it’s all possible in the property world because things happen. And, uh, yeah.

 

Ben Handler:

So where can people find you? Sanjeev?

 

Sanjeev Sah,

Uh, people could find me on, um, investorsdream.com.au my website, or on the LinkedIn or even on Facebook.

Ben Handler:

Excellent. Thank you.

Sanjeev is remarkable. His story has really taught me a lot. It’s also inspired me. He’s a very gracious and humble human being who really brings a positive and dynamic infectious energy into what he’s doing every day. And to transition out of an IT  job that he’d been in for 14 years and move into a full-time buyer’s agent role and start his new business is very, very courageous. It’s been a privilege working with Sanjeev. We’ll see you next week for the show.

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What An Entrepreneur’s Life Can Really Give You 🔮

Buyer's Agent

Ben Handler:

So I remember when we first spoke maybe just over 12 months ago and you were looking to transition out of your recruitment manager role and from what I was hearing you, you weren’t sure you wanted to start your own business. You were considering working for another buyer’s agent business. And then I received a call probably six months later. Six weeks later. Yeah. And you’d resigned. Yes. You’d registered your company name, you were building your website. I mean, what happened?

Emily Wallace:

I think, and I can’t pinpoint it down to a moment, but I think in that transition period, so many thoughts went through my head and I’d been so used to being in an employee that my default was to be under somebody else and learn from somebody. And I think even though it’s had its challenges being out of my own, it’s been the best experience personally and professionally. And the defining point is I, I finally backed myself on something and I was happy to go out on my own. And I know when you got the phone call you were quite surprised you. What do you mean? I thought you’re going to work with somebody. Uh, but I’ve learnt so much more. I I believe, I will never know cause I never ended up working with somebody, but I do believe I learned so much more being out of my own. I’ve been able to pull from different people in the industry and take the best parts of everybody and make it my own. So I’m very grateful for that.

Ben Handler:

Welcome to the buyer’s agent Institute show. Our purpose of the show is to bring awareness to buyers agents to bring awareness to the incredible career opportunities that buyers agents are providing to people to bring awareness to the value that buyers agents are providing to people who need help with buying property. Our goal of the show is to really strip back and dive into the stories and the journeys of remarkable buyers agents who are paving the way forward in this incredibly fast growing new career sector in real estate. Today our guest is Emily Wallace. She’s based in Melbourne. She’s been running her buyer’s agent business for 12 months. She came from a background in education and recruitment and post her Lou leading her recruitment business where she became a buyer’s agent, started her business. She’s now started two more businesses and a podcast, which all compliment her core buyer’s agent business.

Ben Handler:

I’ve been watching M’s story and just her journey over the last 12 months. She’s been building an incredible personal brand and obviously all her business brands. But what’s became more apparent is that she’s really building a tribe and a following of people because she’s very prolific online with how she shares content. And I really believe she’s setting the foundation, the benchmark for buyer’s agents across Australia with how they need to show up and push out content online. I’m really excited to introduce Emily today. Welcome M. thank you so much for having me. Thank you. So you came from Melbourne yesterday?

Emily Wallace:

I did. Late last night. We arrived. And what’s happening here is, so I’m here for a few reasons obviously to see yourself and I’m also going to the AMA tonight, which is the mortgage broking awards. Um, Evelyn Clark, who I do the podcast with is nominated for young gun of the year. So supporting her.

Ben Handler:

Awesome. It’s hard right when you’re working for a company and you’ve been conditioned to that employment system to, to, to make that leap

Emily Wallace:

to go out on your own. Right. And I was only in it for three years. I can’t imagine how much someone who’s been, you know, in a nine to five for maybe 20 odd years, how they may be feeling to really back themselves and do it might take them a bit longer. But yeah, definitely I was conditioned and I’m so glad that I’ve broken out of that cause it’s, it’s really fun and exciting and I love each day. Yeah. Nice. And your podcast, what’s that called now? It’s called, I wish I was taught that at school and I think that encapsulates the exact meaning of what we aim to bring. And that’s education that the school system just doesn’t touch on or teach or life skills that you really need to know to get by.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. I love that. And I read an article recently by Matt Barry. He’s the CEO of freelancer. And the article was based around the education system being very ancient and that we don’t need more lawyers and we don’t need more accountants. We need people to really get out there and start companies, solve problems and really do meaningful work and not just be making coffees and you know, doing juices for people with your podcast. So you’re looking to share like key messages around and themes, what we’re not really properly learning when we’re at school.

Emily Wallace

So the PR, the podcast is based on three pillars being property. Given my role, uh, finance cause Evelyn is my cohost and she’s a broker. And the third piece is mindset. And that one I think is actually going to become more apparent and come to the forefront of the podcast as time goes on. Because people love that. They love hearing different ideas, different ways of thinking and definitely promoting that mindset that that school really doesn’t teach you how important it has might’ve been for you with your massive, the little voice in your head that that talks to you. And I know that’s only one piece to mindset, but that whole point of, of backing yourself and having, I wouldn’t necessarily say a positive attitude because I think people go, Oh, you know, you always said positive and happy and that’s great. But I think having a realistic attitude is even more important. Um, and being very, very realistic about your goals, your expectations, that actually creates a positive attitude because you know what you set out to do and you know that it is achievable and realistic. I mentioned earlier that your social presence, it’s [inaudible], it’s very prominent.

Ben Handler:

It’s obviously very consistent. A lot of people are watching you and I believe a lot of your competition that I’ve seen who have been around a lot longer than you, they’re, they’re copying you, which is a compliment. Yeah, sure. I guess you, you speak very well in front of the camera. Did you, were you doing anything prior that set you up to be,

Emily Wallace

a lot of people ask this question. I think people think I’ve been through a training course or I’ve done TV or something and I haven’t, I put it back to the fact I was heavily involved in performing arts when I was younger. So I’m used to compete in singing a Stedford speech and drama. Um, but I really stopped that when I finished school and there’s been a bit of a gap. Um, I never thought that those skills would come through in this way, but I’m so thankful that they have. Um, and that’s probably the only thing I can put it down to. Outside of that, I just talk the same. I’m talking on camera is the same. I talk off camera maybe a little more pronounced in the way I speak, but the content and what I speak and what I say is still all the same.

Emily Wallace:

And I think that’s key. Just being authentic and being new, there’s no point putting on a stage face, you know, and, and being someone on camera and then being a different person offline, you can’t do that. Authenticity is important. Yeah. So have you found a lot of clients organically through your, through your social posting for your buyer’s agent? Yes. Um, a good example of this, if I can share a story with you. Um, I got a message on LinkedIn message from a financial planner who I’ve never met, um, about three weeks ago and he said, I’ve, I’ve seen your content we’ve never met, but you’re going to get a phone call from a client of mine called Vern and he wants to buy a house. And I’ve told him that you need to, you know, use Emily to buy a house. So I get a call from them within 24 hours and he says, Oh, well my financial planner says we should use you so we’re going to use you.

Emily Wallace:

So they were already, so I didn’t have to sell them. I really didn’t have to sell them on the idea of me, the financial planner who had seen my content believed in me enough to back me without even meeting me, um, to his clients. And long story cut short, um, we did buy, I bought without even meeting the clients. I took them out for lunch to celebrate. That was the first time we met face to face. And that right there was like, if I didn’t make video, if I didn’t educate people with expecting nothing in return, but to help people out along their buying journey, then that client never would have been possible. And I think that’s just so powerful and there’s plenty more stories along the way like that where clients have found me through my video content and through my social media, even through Instagram, one client at the moment who’s just signed on is through Instagram.

Emily Wallace:

So, um, I believe I have a bit of an upper hand in that space that I’m really leveraging and as hard as I can. And some people just don’t understand the concept, which is okay. But I really believe in social media as a driver for uncovering the person behind the screen. And as we all know, there’s this haters on social media and you know, it’s got its pros and cons. I saw a post recently from you about, uh, someone who maybe disagreed or was trying to have a dig at you. Uh, how do you typically rebound from that? Because I know it’s everyone online finds it challenging and a lot of people learn to move through it in different ways. What happened in that situation? So my initial reaction was because there always is this, this, um, point about my age and about that I look young and, Oh, you’re only 26, how can you be doing all this?

Emily Wallace:

And I actually speak it a lot to Evelyn about this and she’s been a great support person cause she gets the same. And I think I’ve never seen my age as a barrier or the way I look as a barrier when it brought up as a comment in hate. I kind of, there’s a couple of pieces to it. My first thought is that person must be very unhappy with themselves if they’ve got time to put me down. Um, the other piece is do they wish that they were like that? Do they, um, are they unhappy with where they are and do they really feel the need to take it out on someone just because they look a certain way? If we picked people and their professions based on the way they looked, right. If you didn’t like them, you’re going to pick a heart surgeon based on the way they look.

Emily Wallace:

I don’t think so. Like you’re going to pick them based on their skill set and, and your alignment with them. So those hateful comments. Yes. Initially I’d be lying if it didn’t take a bit of a stab. Like when you first read it, it’s like, Oh, how could someone be so mean? But then the second part of me just laughed and use it as motivation to go, well, look at me now. You know, I think and that pushing forward, I’m going to keep going forward. Um, is, is really key. Yeah. I admired the way you dealt with that because I resonated with that situation because I had a similar experience when I started my buyers as your business in my early twenties. Yes. There’s this thing in Australia where they just want to know how old you are and what you’ve done. God, if you don’t mind me asking how old you are, how old are you?

Emily Wallace:

It’s like I don’t actually reverse it. Right. I don’t go to someone go, Oh you look like you might be about 50 50 no, we don’t say that. So why is it okay to say it to the younger generation? And it’s actually rude to say it to the older generation. Like how is that? That’s just not a fair balance is it? It doesn’t stack up. And John McGraw I’m in, but I read once, he said if you’re good enough, you’re old enough. And in America instead of asking you how old someone is, if they’re doing something good, they want to know how you’re doing it. Yes. They just want to know how you’re doing that. Which is the important question. That’s such an important question to be asking. So I just really admire it because I mean it’s, it is difficult online trying to move through all the people who are jealous or envious.

Emily Wallace:

And I don’t know, I just see a lot of it online and just, it’s challenging. Yeah. But would they say it to my face? Probably not. So I think at the end of the day, online is a buffer for people to put out the hate they want to put out. And that’s fine. But I know they’d probably never say it to my face and that just kind of makes it, you know, the point that it doesn’t really matter. How does your day look like now you’re running three businesses, you’re running a podcast, your, you’re in startup phases. How’s it like what do you, my days are crazy and my days are great though. A lot of it, there’s always an element of networking somewhere, whether that be a face to face event or a one to one coffee with someone that’s found me on LinkedIn and we’ve connected and we’re taking it offline.

Emily Wallace:

Always a meeting of some kind. I don’t think I’ve ever had a day where I’m just in the office. Um, then also obviously inspections for clients. Um, video, content planning and um, and prospecting, you know, outbound. You can’t have a pipeline that’s full and go and bank on it. Um, and not be generating more relationships with other referral partners, um, that you’re happy to work with and be aligned with or um, that video content that keeps me front of mind and a lot of people’s feed so you can’t let the ball drop. Cause as soon as you do, your competitor comes in over the top. And I love that. I love that. I’m not competitive by nature in terms of, you know, and it was never competitive with sport or anything like that, but I’m competitive with myself and I know that I want to set the benchmark of what level of content I’m putting out and how that generates business for me. So that’s always in my day in some way, shape or form.

Ben Handler:

Well, you’re executing on that. I mean I mentioned at the beginning of the introduction that you are, I believe setting the benchmark of how people in the buyer’s agent sector need to push out content. Yes, yes. The message and the communication and what they’re actually sharing because it needs to be relevant. The information that people share. Yes. Yeah. And I mean you mentioned prospecting earlier about pipeline.

Emily Wallace:

How important is prospecting for the buyer’s agent? It’s massive. You really, you can’t bank on until it’s signed with a client. Because think about it when someone’s going to buy a property and the thought is there, they might not be ready to buy right there. And then, so the conversations, I mean my pipeline, sometimes there’s people I’ve had a conversation with actually what I had in January and we only bought in August because they didn’t have everything lined up. So the prospecting piece of your mortgage brokers, lawyers, financial planners, those relationships to continue those, it’s like if you look at spreading them across 10, if one dropped off, and I actually learned this at a recent like convention I went to, if you had 10 partners and one of them dropped off, what does that mean from an income point of view? So keep spreading your eggs wide because you can’t bank on one or two or three.

Emily Wallace:

You got to have 10 at least. So that’s my continual. Um, it’s didn’t make sure I’ve got those people in place and I maintain those relationships authentically. How, how’s it been going? Developing relationships with real estate agents. What I found from meeting many, many real estate agents is there’s a, it’s kind of two types in it and I don’t want to, I have really good relationships with agents, but I’ve found is when I look to work together, there’s one half that would like to do it from a transactional point of view. And there’s one half you want to do it for the greater good for the buyers. And I love working with those greater good people because they will send people to me because they’ve seen them at five or six open homes. They’re not getting anywhere. They know they need my help and they hand over a name and number and they say, M just do a good job.

Emily Wallace:

You know, and I hope what goes around comes around and the next listing will come, you know, from you when, you know, when you have it for me. So I love that. And, uh, without being, this is kind of a bit ironic, but without being ageist, I’ve actually found it to the younger agents who are more willing to do that education piece and happy to help, um, buyers in that pocket. And they know when they’re out of their depth and they’re happy to hand them onto an agent, a buyer’s agent. The gen Y is spreading the love, spreading the love. Why not? I, from what I understood, I mean, I had an office in, in Albert Park at one stage in Melbourne, and

Ben Handler:

we, from what we understood in the Melbourne market, it was much more difficult than Sydney to get referrals from real estate agents. So it’s great to hear that you’re getting referrals

Emily Wallace:

from real estate agents. Yeah, I am. I’m not, I wouldn’t say they’re my main lead source by any means. Mortgage brokers and financial planners are my key. And my own content is, is actually probably King of, of all. Um, but yeah, the real estate agents who, who get it and they understand and they’re, they know their job is to sell and my job is to buy. They actually, they’re great partners to work with.

Ben Handler:

What do you love about, I mean, you’re running multiple businesses. Like what do you love about being out of the employment world and running a business?

Emily Wallace:

Uh, I have choice, a lot of choice now. I don’t work any, I don’t work less. I work almost double in terms of my output. Um, but that reward is 100% mean. I’m not working for the man or you know, giving it to someone else in a higher up that may or may not appreciate my work. I appreciate what I do and it comes back to me full circle. So I think that the choice in my output, creating my lifestyle and what I want to achieve is, is being really key. But also like the networking piece. I didn’t know how much I would love networking. I love going to events and talking to people and meeting new people. And also the best part of it is seeing how I can introduce them to more people. Most of the time I’ll say, you know, I’ll learn about their business. Who’s the referral partners? Who do you work with the most and then see if I have someone I can intro them to. And I love that. I really do. Um, I think as a whole business in itself. But uh, yeah, I think the, the social aspect of, of business and being with likeminded people, it’s been very enlightening. Yeah. And I’m sure your brains

Ben Handler:

moving 24 hours a day, how do you switch off?

Emily Wallace:

Uh, it’s a challenge. I won’t lie. Switching off is like the moment I wake up it’s like I can ready to go. Um, so I’ve, I walk a lot. Um, I’ve definitely walk every day. Um, and in that I’m kind of listening to music or a podcast and I do slowly like switch off thoughts will come and go, but I slowly switch off. Um, I also go to the pool, I’m in st Kilda and just sit in the hot seat, Barb’s down there and just sort of quite close my eyes and switch off. Um, people keep telling me I need to try meditation and I’m sure you would tell me that too, cause I know you’re big on it. Um, I will get there baby steps. Um, but that’s probably my key. Walking and, and being sort of calm in the pool when it in a hot pool was really nice

Ben Handler:

from my experience running businesses when I started my first business, I F F I went through a very deep transformation of, of growing personally and professionally. Have you found, since you’ve exited the corporate world and now embarked on your entrepreneurial journey, have you gone through a similar style of

Emily Wallace:

yes, and I think the biggest reflection of that is who I choose to associate myself with now. So I think I have, I definitely have changed, not morally or fundamentally, but my, where my mind goes to and what’s possible is definitely changed to the point where I’m frustrated probably is not the right word, but I find it hard to understand others who don’t think that way. I have a level of empathy, but probably not as high as as ovens would. Um, when people think that things aren’t possible or, um, or don’t think in the same mindset as me, I don’t mind spending time with them, but I know that there’s a limited amount of conversation that’s held and I’d rather be with people who think similar to the way I do. I call them energy vampires. Like the way, the way that I look at my days, I’ve, it’s like a bar on your phone.

Emily Wallace:

Yes, yes, your energy just goes, but if you’re hanging around the wrong style of people who are sucking your energy, it depletes it and then it doesn’t help your, your output in the day. Are you selective with who you spend time with? I would say in the last three to six months I’ve been more selective. I didn’t realize, um, I probably didn’t have that level of awareness prior and I would just say yes to catching up with anybody and, you know, friends or professionals. Um, now I’m very, um, aware of, of what that means and if I am spending time with someone who, who is sort of at a certain level of mindset where they want to be, I actually go into that knowing that’s how the conversation’s going to be and I’m okay with that. Um, I think you need that. You can’t always be on, right.

Emily Wallace:

You need those people who are your friends who are, um, happy to work a nine to five and they’re happy to do their bit and away they go. Um, but yeah, I am a bit more selective and aware of where my time goes and who and who I’m spending it with. Yeah, it’s important. Did you buy a property last week for clients? I did. How was that experience? So that was a great one cause we bought it before auction, um, and Melbourne auctions right now. So we’re filming in October of 2019. Um, the auction clearance rates are really up. Um, and the competition, like I went to one where there was eight different bidders for one property. I’m like, geez, they’re all preapproved for finance. Like, this is crazy. So I knew when I found this property we had to buy it before auction and it’s the first one I’ve purchased prior to auction for a client and that was great.

Emily Wallace:

The agent was wrapped, the vendor was wrapped and my clients are so happy. Um, so yeah, that was really, really cool putting the sold sticker up. So always good fun. And um, they’re really, really happy with her as though it’s good pre auction. I know Melbourne’s a very auction orientated style of market. Well they love a show down there. Right? They love, they love the show, but I get it. You put it in a competitive arena, you get the highest price and at least the vendor knows, they really put it to market and really tested it well. Yeah. So I get that. But we were fortunate to be able to purchase this one prior. What I loved around when I was acting as a buyer’s agent representing clients is, is that joy when you buy for a client, the post buying that. Yeah. Experience.

Emily Wallace:

Like do you, have you found, yeah. I’ll never forget. There was this one client who was a very lengthy transaction and it was a single mum with three kids and she enlisted my help and it was a sale with the bank involved. And I got the phone call. I said, I gave them a deadline. It’s like this is the final deadline, 4:00 PM Friday. And I was at the Mazda, um, service centre waiting for my car to be serviced at at three o’clock, I got a call and it was, you know, you’ve got, you’ve got the property office been accepted. And I remember I just went and knew and everyone was like, what is that girl doing? I was so excited. I started crying. Then I called the client, she started crying. Um, it’s such a life changing moment and it’s the single biggest investment that people make in their life most of the time is the purchase of their own home.

Emily Wallace:

So I never take that for granted that I’m part of that and I’m honoured. People still send me pictures of, you know, the furniture being moved in or the bathroom renovations and what things look like. It’s a really, I underestimated how much you are a part of that and become part of their, their big step in life. And they love telling you all about it post-purchase. And that’s great. I really enjoy it. And it’s amazing how like advisers we build these like longterm relationships with the client. Yes. They, they move beyond the transaction. Right? They do, they do. Like they become like friends, you know, and I’d happily go and have lunch or a coffee with multiple clients that I’ve helped. So, um, that’s something I never expected, but it’s been a nice surprise. Nice. And why are all your clients that have engaged you typically, what problems are you solving for them?

Emily Wallace:

I think the biggest thing is a couple of different parts to it. One of them with the people I’ve helped that have been on their own, um, so perhaps they’ve come out of divorce or they are, um, purchasing their first home on their own. They really need, um, handholding through that process. They do and they need someone who knows the market. Keep in mind a buyers entering at a certain point in time of the market, whereas we’re transacting in it every day, every week. So we understand it. That lack of knowledge that you can help make up and bring them up to speed quite quickly is very beneficial. Obviously time saving time is a massive component of it, uh, particularly for for workers, uh, and saving them money so they’re not overpaying because quote ranges at the moment and understanding what a quote range actually means and really doing analysis on comparable sales.

Emily Wallace:

They don’t understand it enough to do it themselves. They could try, but I’m not sure they’ve got the same would get the same result. So time, money, research and reassurance. Um, uh, probably some of the key things I’ve found that people engage me for and there are big parts, massive parts. Yeah. And it’s just scary to think before I started my buys edge business 10 years ago, that all these buyers are doing it themselves, up against real estate agents who work for the seller. It baffles me. And the explanation I’ve started to give to people is I say, you wouldn’t go into a car into court with a victim and offender with only the offender having representation. Would you? And people go, Oh yeah, that makes a lot of sense. So why would you buy a house when the vendor’s representative and you’re not? And the penny drops.

Emily Wallace:

You can actually see, I was telling the Uber driver actually about this and Oh yeah, that makes so much sense. And it’s true. And I do think it will become the, the way that we do real estate over time. And I’m so glad I’ve entered it at a point where it’s still growing very, very much growing. Um, but I would like to help in level that playing field by the time I’ve finished an industry, make it more even. It’s great. And I mean, that’s, that’s the purpose of this show. It’s really just to spread that awareness to people around a, the value that buys and is actually provide and be the actual career opportunity of, of becoming a buyer’s agent. There’s so much opportunity. There’s plenty. We haven’t even scratched the surface. There are so many. If every mortgage broker in Australia was aligned with an advocate, can you imagine like it’s just crazy, or even every, there’s 65,000 real estate agents.

Emily Wallace:

Why are they not all aligned with a buyer’s advocate? I don’t know. It’s crazy. I mean, it doesn’t make sense and people will watch this back in like 10 years time back. They were right. We were right. We’re gonna start to finish up now as I guess a final question for you. I mean, seeing the 12 months and what you’ve accomplished has been, it’s been incredible. Yeah. Especially just the different style of businesses that you’ve set up. What is the plan for you over the knee? I mean, I’m, I’m excited to see what’s going to come to you for the next 12 months. So you just going to consolidate and work on your businesses or what do you, yeah, I think three is enough for now. Three. Three in a podcast is enough. Always thinking of new business ideas and there’s so many things that go on on my, in my head.

Emily Wallace:

I need to really bring in that control and um, and be focused. My goal is very much around, um, building out the buying coach business, which is the online learning platform to make that, um, quite scalable and uh, Australia wide, that’s, that’s the next sort of, um, year to three year plan with that. Um, my full service offering is to continue to have quality clients that really want to work with me and I want to work with them and, and get some great results. And for the LinkedIn and education business is to be in more corporate environments and be the GoTo trainer for content on LinkedIn to help drive sales for businesses no matter what size they are. So across all that, um, I think education is the fundamental and if I remain in that through the growth period of all businesses, I think there’ll be longstanding.

Emily Wallace:

Um, and obviously I’ll be recruiting some staff at some point too. So having staff on board is a, is a new challenge, a new experience and I can’t wait to learn more through that journey as well cause it’s going to be really exciting. That’s incredible. I mean you mentioned two words, you said education and recruitment and you studied education, you came from a recruiting role, so you’re going to leverage that now and yeah, and the recruitment piece, I didn’t know how to recruit so um, yes, but the pressure’s on for your own business cause you don’t want to make a mistake. So that’s right. Before we close up, where can people find you with these three businesses and your podcasts? Certainly. So LinkedIn is probably the most obvious one for professionals. So Emily Wallace, um, my Instagram, if you want behind the scenes of my day, which I do give a lot of, uh, is Emily_Wallace_ BA for buyer’s advocate.

Emily Wallace:

Uh, and yeah, between those two platforms, um, we also promote the podcast on both, but the podcast is called, I wish I was taught that at school and that’s across all the major, you know, Apple, Spotify. Oh, the major ones where you’d find podcasts. I love the name. I wish I was taught that at school. How many times do you hear people say that though? In conversation. Right. All the time.

 

Ben Handler:

We’re going to close up now, I would highly recommend that you check out and look into Emily’s respective businesses. She’s really paving a new way with how entrepreneurs and new business owners should be doing things, and especially in the real estate space as a buyer’s agent, I really think she’s leading the trend in the content producing format that she’s putting out online. So please check her out. We’ll see you next week.

Please watch the full episode here:

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Arjun Paliwal’s Transformation

Helping changing other people's lives

Below you will find the conversation between Ben Handler and Arjun Paliwal for the Buyer’s Agent Institute Show

Ben Handler:

So, whereabouts are you investing at the moment?

Arjun Paliwal:

Across the country really. Pretty much all States outside of Northern territory and reviewing, you know, parts of Brisbane, Adelaide, some parts of Sydney commercial, residential, and if you made your regional markets as well.

Ben Handler:

Welcome back to the buyer’s agent Institute show. I’m your host Ben handler. Today we have the privilege of our Arjun Paliwal joining us. He started a company called InvestorKit based in Sydney. It’s a national investment company. He’s built that company into an incredible company over the last 13 months. And today we’re going to dive into learning more about his journey. Welcome Arjun.

Arjun Paliwal:

Hey Ben. Thanks for having me.

Ben Handler:

You’re welcome. And before you obviously started your business, you were in the corporate game CBA. How long were you in that game for?

Arjun Paliwal:

Well I actually moved over from New Zealand what, nine years ago. And CBA itself was seven of those nine years. So straight into it.

Ben Handler:

Nice. And before CBA I hear you’re a dancer or..

Arjun Paliwal:

Yeah, look, I was into a bunch of things. So, funny enough when I moved over from New Zealand to here, I had a few mutual friends that were connected from New Zealand, Australia. They were into dancing and that led to a lot of cool stuff like the people I was dancing with. We’ve got to do some, you know, curtain raises for justice crew and we were able to, you know, dance around, get paid for some of it as well. And it was just that study, you know, play a bit of basketball and I didn’t really imagine all of this happening from the end. But yeah, that’s where it all started dancing.

Ben Handler:

Nice. What, were there any skills from that dancing time that you’ve been able to transfer into what you’re doing now?

Arjun Paliwal:

I definitely say routine, practice, action, make mistakes, get back up. Like in dancing. You make a lot of mistakes and from a routine that you practice again and again, I’m even bath basketball, which is another massive hobby. You miss a lot of shots. I still miss a lot of shots even now cause I’m not brushed up as they used to be. But from that, that whole no fear of making a mistake because you just got to keep practicing something until you can get it right. I think that’s the most transferable skill and as a result of practice comes discipline, just really getting that right.

Ben Handler:

That’s right. And property is your hobby. Would you say?

Arjun Paliwal:

Oh, it’s a hobby, passion and just so much more.

Ben Handler:

Running your BA business has that, does that feel like work for you?

Arjun Paliwal:

Not at all really for work, I think it’s a bit of an overused word. I just don’t resonate with that word. I just don’t feel it. What I do now is making relationships with people, helping them out with goals that they’re looking to achieve and feeling like I am in a position to help them because of my own personal experience as well as how engulf I am with what I’m doing every day. And that’s where the BA is just a label for this business. But really it’s just helping people kick some pretty cool goals.

Ben Handler:

You seem like a, I mean, I’ve watched your journey over 13 months or 15 or 14 or however long it’s been. It’s around that time. It’s been a remarkable journey. You’ve grown very quickly. It seems like you’ve got that natural entrepreneurial blood.

Arjun Paliwal:

Yeah, I mean I’m, I’m, I pinch myself every day, like with how fast it’s grown and what’s happened. It’s not like this is my fifth or sixth business deep. This is my first business. Right. but what I feel that I, I guess enjoy the most out of this growth or this entrepreneurship journey has just been having a group of people around me, mentors like yourself, and just people that I can reflect off of. Because whilst it’s a, you know, a new business for me, it’s not a new concept. It’s not a new, you know, thing that has never been done and, and success leaves those trails. And I think from that, whilst I can say that, yeah, cool. It’s gone really well in the first year. It’s not just because of me, it’s because there’s people out there, they’ve done well, like yourself and, and a few others. And I’m just picking out what’s worked and really applying it every day.

Ben Handler:

How important is it to surround yourself with the right people? How important has it been for you since starting your new business? To surround yourself with the right people?

Arjun Paliwal:

Yeah, look at critical mindsets, everything, and I know it’s an overused word a little bit, but I don’t mean mindset in terms of, you know, having certain things that you do to condition the mind or, or what you eat or all that. Like those are important. But what I mean by mindset in its greatest form to me is just the words that come out of the mouth of people around you. Like that is everything. Like if you really think about it, like our whole day is speaking and listening, speaking in this thing, speaking, listening, and by just changing the people around you of who listens in what they say. That’s what’s been super important in this journey. So having those people around you from, yes, you can do that. I used to do this, I’ve done this.

Have you tried this? Rather than, Oh, I’m not sure about that. I don’t think they’ll work and, and it’s crazy. I think most of the people who come up with ideas or thoughts or how they can help people or how they can help or start a business or what they should do. Most of the problem is that people speak it out to the wrong people and then that just kills everything because the responses to it kill your minds. I think to answer your question, it’s the most important because having these people around me has made me just continually speak what’s on my mind, this growth journey and it’s all going really well.

Ben Handler:

I blasted a post, I think yesterday or the day before, recognizing you for what you’ve done and listening you, you’re, you’re, you’re a phenomenal listener. You’re someone who, you listen with intent and then you actually go and execute and some people don’t do the listening, but they execute somehow and it goes wrong. Or some people listen but they can’t execute. Have you always been someone who has been curious about what other people do or just your learning and you’ve always been a good listener or is this something you developed over the last few years?

Arjun Paliwal:

Does definitely developed throughout my banking career. Really started there. I always used to ask myself, there’s a thousand plus branch managers in this one bank I worked for. Why is this happening to me? Like why is this all going so well? And I, I found there was one key difference people don’t realize in that industry, and even in the buyer’s agent industry, when you’re buying property for people who are in the banking space doing loans, there are some very successful people that walk through the doors. Too often you get focused on your internal organization, the next general manager, the next executive, you know, she’s really good at that. He’s really good at that, the CEO. But you don’t realize that there are multiple CEOs walk into your business every day, multiple people who’ve had it all go wrong and had it all go right. That was the game changer. Listening to customers, hearing their stories, not just realizing there’s a deal to be done here that’s going to happen. People don’t walk to your door in the bank just to ask what the time is or how’s your day been? They walk in with a purpose of can you help me with this or I’m thinking about this. So I always anticipated the deal was going to happen of some sort. Just cater it to them. But the main thing was they have to disclose everything. I’m in a role where people have to tell you what they have, what they spend, what they earn, what’s wrong with asking that question of how did you get there, where did it all start for you?

And so that started with me. I have customers coming in and I just was curious, very, very curious. Stories. What are they, how do they, how do they lose everything? Like when they’re coming to discharge their home cause they had a distress out. How did it happen? How did it get to that point? When they’re coming to buy multiple properties and it’s their 10th 15th to 20th when someone in flip flops comes in and they’ve got 15 20 million in assets and they’re, you know, just scruffy and this and that. Like that doesn’t have to look the piece right. It just through all these judgmental is that in my way. And that’s when it changed for me just asking people about how they did something, how something went well, went wrong, and just listen to their stories and, and I think I just took that on from banking to now property and just, I’ll never let go that.

I’ll just always ask questions. It’s just, I don’t consider myself someone who goes to innovate or find the next coolest idea. I just am someone who goes, how did you do it? What did you do? Why did you do it? What was the purpose? Who was helped along the way? What was the mistakes made? And just go do it. Like it doesn’t have to be that hard.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. I admire you for your curiosity. It’s a, it’s a skill that it’s a skill that, or it’s a talent. It’s, it’s something that not everyone has a lot of people like to talk. You know, we’ve got two ears and one mouth for a reason. However, a lot of people prefer to talk as opposed to listen and also as you get curious around if you’ve got these customers coming in who are ultra successful or how did you get all those properties and why did you fail and you’re already curious at that stage so that that’s awesome.

I know what it’s like leaving the corporate world you stuck with you. I feel like you’re in a, it can be in a very closed circle environment and it limits you with understanding, well this is my perspective. It can limit you from understanding what is capable in the real world to what you can actually do and create. And I know the feeling of when you leave the corporate world and you start your own business, the positive emotion that gets triggered, like liberation, freedom, creativity. You feel empowered when you started InvestorKit, like how did you feel when you started to get a bit of traction coming from that corporate world? What was going on for you?

Arjun Paliwal:

The first feeling that was going through my mind was responsibility. Like I felt a huge positive weight on the shoulders. And, and what it was was there were people coming in and they were always doing that in the banking space, but when it was your own, your own brand, you people coming in and trusting you with everything to help them out. And that was a really special feeling for me. And off the back of that, I just realized the more and more I did that, the more and more I could help people, the scale that I could apply, the people that could help, that responsibility starts with that feeling. But then it turns into an outcome for them. They’ve achieved something, whether it’s the first or the next investment and the wealth that’s being created. And so for me, that’s where it started, that feeling of just that positive feeling of responsibility in a good way.

And then from there going to, you know, through scaling this and, and helping more people, you’re making huge differences to people’s lives. Like they’re trusting you with a massive financial decision here and if and should that all go well makes a huge difference to what they can do as a result of it all. So that was my first feeling.

Ben Handler:

What, why do you get out of bed each day at the moment? What is really what is really driving you to, to build your business and the journey you’re going on.

Arjun Paliwal:

At first it wasn’t as clear because I just want to just help people. And as a result of helping people, you’re also helping yourself. Like that was the first thought. But when, you know, some of my team started building out, that’s when it really hit me. And I’ll give you the example of one of the team members.

I actually grew up with him back in New Zealand. He found his way over here to Australia. And funny story is that his mum and my mum were also very close friends to a level where they’re so close that he was named after my name and we share the same name. It’s very corny. Now pass that story and him working in the team. What hit me was as a result of helping a customer, I’ve been able to, or multiple customers, I’ve been able to get the business to a stage where I’ve helped someone who’s grown up with me to have employment, to be in the industry, to go and achieve some of the goals they’ve had, and these little things started making huge differences to me mentally, like just a couple of customers. My first 13 months has helped multiple people gain employment and my team has made differences to their lives and their family’s lives has made differences to the customers that I’m helping with their mindset and the wealth they’re creating and as a reward. There’s also a difference made to my life, but that’s now the triggering effect. The scale that I want to achieve is the same way I helped a family friend just transformed their life and where they’re going. Other staff members in my team, customers where they’re going, I just want to do more of that. And the end result is sure, there’s also a reward for the company, a reward for us as a result. But being rewarded for helping people. There’s nothing, nothing wrong with that. So I think really that’s where now it gets me up every day. I’m helping people create wealth, creating jobs. I’m impacting multiple people and I’m also impacting me, my family as a result of it. So that’s, that’s where now I get up and massive purpose.

Ben Handler:

That’s respect your, you’re creating profound transformation externally to customers. You’re creating job opportunities for, for people that are very close to you. And I’ll see obviously people who aren’t, but you’re just, you’re creating, I think all round transformation for people now intrinsically and externally. That’s powerful.

Arjun Paliwal:

Yeah. And I think whilst that’s also very replicable in the corporate world from the organizations you work with and what the organizations do, having that control, having the full impact of it passed on by you, and having the choice of who gets impacted along the way and making changes immediately. Not running through barriers like if I can recall, just one thing that made me really excited was I, I had a customer, “tell me a couple of months ago, I love the process. It was fantastic Arjun, but there are too many emails and I was like, wait, but doesn’t want everyone want a bunch of emails” to make them feel like this person’s working hard and doing everything for them.

Having the whole life out source of property. But he hit me in a really smart way, which was like, well, there’s ways to optimize communication here. I would’ve gone through 20 deep barriers through 20 layers of management to share my suggestion to convince a hundred stakeholders and a massive firm and then probably have a, a roadblock of million. It’s going to cost millions of dollars to apply the solution, cause the scale and then go back to my, you know, cubby hole in this little cubicle and go, I can’t do that onto the next thing that that’s important to them. Like that’s wasn’t the case. I went back, I invested lots of money, lots of time in building out systems and optimizations and my processes. So now customers can condense all their emails in one notification, depending on how they want it. You want it to be five minutes, 12 hours every day.

You want to see the whole process map data hit a time. So you might not even need emails like these little things. That’s, that’s something that like, you know, you can just take on feedback and make a difference in your business and do it now.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. And you obviously care about it. You are there to refine your systems and processes, get feedback from your customers and you’re there to just create a better experience for them, which is, which is very evident and you’re one of the very few people that I see who heavily invests, especially in year one into the business and you’re so focused on reinvesting into the business and that’s why you’re, I think you also growing such an exception, exceptionally fast growing business. Are you in the game? Would you see yourself in the game of buying property or your in the game of business

Arjun Paliwal:

Business and that business just makes a bunch of impacts in different ways.

Jobs, property, confidence with their journey. Like you can imagine someone not from a show off lens but from a confidence lens, you’ve never owned an asset before. You’ve wished how this could be a part of your journey and then all of a sudden someone’s helped you buy two or three. What does that do to your financial confidence? What does that lead to so much other parts of your life knowing that when you go out to dinner you, it’s okay cause you’ve done a whole bunch of things for yourself. Right? Like just a little thing. So and, and this property business is just a tool that I feel that my skill set lies in. I feel that my confidence lies in, I feel that my ability to add value lies in and that’s what I think everyone needs to find. Like if property is your skillset or you know, if, if these things are inspired, you know, you enjoy, you’re motivated by it.

Like this business part is really what it’s all about and this is just a tool and that tool of properties, what I feel, you know, confident in and motivated in and that’s what I’m doing.

Ben Handler:

Yeah. It’s buying properties. Just the byproduct of, of running a business. Right. What have you learned about yourself in the last 14 months running a business? Because I know from experience running businesses, it’s an incredible opportunity to go introspective self-awareness hopefully expands professionally and personally. Transformation typically occurs. What have you really learned about yourself over the last 14 months? Going through all the challenges and opportunities that you’ve been working through?

Arjun Paliwal:

What I’ve learned about myself is I found a new gear. Like, you know, you’re, you’re in fifth speed and then the sixth speed comes out of nowhere and you’ve got this, you know, new, new, new powers or skills or, or so forth.

And what I’m referring to with that example is that I thought that my limits, what I could do in certain times, how much of a service I could provide, it would look like this with going into business. Like, it’s not to say you don’t care about whatever job you’re in. People work hard all across the different jobs that are out there, but every day when it’s your name, your reputation, you know, your image that is on the line with each and every customer. I found the sixth gear, what I can do for them, how much I can help. And I’ve really found that like what I thought I could do and I, and I mean in terms of things I could do in a day, what I could, you know, achieve personally, achieve for others. It’s just in new levels as a result of being in business.

And I think that sixth gear is something that I can now try. And what I’m trying to do now is apply it to different parts of life. I haven’t successfully applied to all parts of my life, but I know that with this new found motivation, like I can, I can apply it in different ways.

Ben Handler:

Do you acknowledge yourself for, for what you’ve done over the last 14 months?

Arjun Paliwal:

No, I don’t think so. I don’t think I do it enough. But I think people around you can really shape that. Sometimes I’ll be honest, like in, in, in business, you can, you can feel like nothing’s happening like everyday, sometimes only because of how invested you are in it. Like the, the downside of that becomes that you want to do so much more because you’ve seen that in such a short time you’ve made such a difference and you never look back, celebrate, reflect you know, pinch yourself or anything.

But that doesn’t ever happen sometimes. But I think, you know, having my family, my wife, my friends, my clients, mentors that has helped me recognize and, and really start to think, yeah, look, I mean there are differences being made. There is an improvement being made because sometimes that’s probably the trap that business owners can fall in. You’re in such a state of improvement all the time that you never look back and go, hold on a minute. Like, I was just trying to see who I could help in my first few months, like 13 months ago. And, and trying to get them to understand how I can help to now, like it’s just a whole different thing. So yeah, I don’t think I do it enough, but I think I’ve got people around me that helped me sort of do it.

Ben Handler:

Did you ever think your business in that first 12 months would grow the way it did?

I mean you, you jumped straight in deep into the six figure Mark. Like did you think it was going to go that way? Genuinely?

Arjun Paliwal:

Goals, yes. But you know how sometimes you can just set these goals just because you think you’re, you know, you think you are like inspired, motivated. Like I know those first steps of starting with goals, I set some pretty decent ones. But on the back end you can know that’s fake. Like you just know you’re setting them and you’re like, yeah, ah, I want to help this many people. I want to do this. And, and you know, you don’t believe in it. So I genuinely didn’t believe in it, but I felt like spoken initially, but I didn’t believe that I could achieve that. And so I was surprised and I still am surprised when I look back. Last one months I was like, okay, this can happen and you can achieve this next phase.

So this next 12 months ahead, I’m renewing my confidence even more about what I’m going to set, what I can do rather than just saying that, but then not really feeling it as much as I’m saying it.

Ben Handler:

And I’m assuming your new goals are, they’re going to be large because you’ve had such an incredible first 12 months that you’re your second calendar year or financial year, however you’re measuring it’s going to be, it’s going to be a big one.

Arjun Paliwal:

Yeah, definitely. And in all aspects, the team that I want to build, the number of customers lives that I want to impact the people I want to help see, you know, what a buyer’s agent can do for them from a residential property and also the transition from many residential investors into commercial property. Like just across all of these things together. I definitely feel that the seed gets far bigger.

Because of that renewed confidence for my first year.

Ben Handler:

Why do you think there has, there’s not a lot of buyer’s agents in Australia. I know you’re new to the sector.

Arjun Paliwal:

I think it starts with a personal belief that why would someone pay someone else to do something for you? And being property is specifically, but so many parts of our lives are outsourced today. Like you’re doing it every day. When you go from meal, it’s a, a restaurant or chef buyer’s agents, right? Like, you know, they’re, they’re helping you get that meal that you want to buy, right? When you go down to the, to grab a car, like, like Uber or a taxi, like someone’s driving you around, like this whole outsource our life or parts of our life is happening everyday at different levels of scale for different tasks. And it’s just about time that people realize that the importance of outsourcing property it can impact your life in terms of time with family, time with friends.

It can impact your life financially by making decisions without as much of a deep dive of knowledge about it. You can, you know, rush decisions because of that. Feel like you’ve been missing out so for so long and you’re, you know, you’re really sick of it and you rushed decisions. Sometimes you’re can be higher levels of stress cause you keep worrying if you’re buying the right one or the wrong one. There’s so many things, right? Like there’s so much, there’s a problem out there today that there’s too much information. Information overload is a huge problem. It’s caused many of my clients who’ve shared their stories to not make any decisions for years and years and years on end. It’s caused many people to believe one thing than see another and then now believe that second thing and then not believe the first thing.

Right. I, where I, it hit me hard was when I was, you know, finishing my MBA, I actually tested this theory in my MBA. I had, I had a topic and in this one topic I wrote an assignment that went in this direction saying that X was incorrect and here’s why. With references. Then the same topic in my exam, I went in the other direction that X was Y is incorrect. And here’s why. Both passed for the same concept, same concept. And that just made me realize that information, there’s a problem with information. Like you can have references, you can find what you want to believe and create a story of what you want to believe. Right. to the extremes around earth, flat earth, right?

Like like even though it’s silly, but like people genuinely believe it.

The stop and have research associated with it and that’s a massive problem with property. Or you can’t get cashflow if you want capital growth or you can’t get capital growth if you want cashflow. And then there’s all these people I see from my banking career doing both and I literally see it. I’m like, whitewash what? What do you mean? And so that’s, that’s where you know, coming back to this journey, like that’s, that’s where it’s all sort of come together.

Ben Handler:

It’s incredible. And you’re right. I mean they’re there. We’re living in an information overloaded world right now and it’s getting worse and it’s overwhelming. You know, if you want to, if you’re a punter out there trying to understand where to buy property, I mean it could be too, too overwhelming. And so a buyer’s agent is just going to make a concise, digestible, clear, defined strategy. This is what we do, which is a big value add ride in this information overloaded world. I mean, we could sit here for days, I mean I could sit here for days and you just picking up and learning around what you’re up to and the journey you’re on because it’s inspiring. And I think for people listening to this who are maybe in the employment world, it’s change is hard, right? I think in all aspects of our lives, we don’t typically like change as human beings. We like to be get complacent with what we’re doing. Was getting out of the the corporate world and running your own business a significant milestone in your life?

Arjun Paliwal:

It actually takes me back to this story in primary school and everyone was dressing up for what they wanted to be in and do. People came in like police officers, uniform the fireman, doctor, all this stuff. And that was really cool. I came in with hair slicked back, like I was Draco Malfoy.

I came in on a little bit of a suit this little six-seven year-old and, and I said, I want to run my own business someday. So it started from there. But you get into the race of, and look, I will never say that race or things like that. The corporate world wasn’t a core part of it. I mean, you know, Jack Ma, perfect example talks about people jumping into the world of big businesses, the operational processes, our systems, you know, to run a business at that scale, like that’s valuable skills to service an at a high quality of service, create organization culture you know, and deliver a service level with such consistency across thousands of people. Like he, he talks about the importance of working in that sort of space. And then he also talks about the importance of working in small companies to have that dream, to have that vision, not just a dream and a vision that every big company slaps on a billboard, but the real stuff where they actually work to it every day and they’re trying to actually see them astronomical changes and that small business.

So that was super important, the big company, but it kept, this milestone kept getting blocked off because you just get so engulfed in the next step. I want to go from a teller in my banking job to an assistant manager, to a manager, to an executive manager, an area manager, and you get lost on this way up that you don’t think about that original goal and milestone ahead. So I got to actually give all the credit to my wife who, you know, gave me a bit of a shakeup and said, had you ever questioned yourself when things are going so well that you should do something different? And I was like, why would you do that? Come on. Like you’ve just been humbled and blessed by the, probably the most rapid career progression at CBA at that time. Commonwealth Bank and I was just, it was going really good.

Right? And I was just like, nah, nah, not leaving, not leaving, not leaving, not going, but the next step, the next step. And she just, what’s the worst case? Like you’ve done all this stuff already. You’ve had a career in the head office, you’ve had a career in the front line. I was graduate studies, you built an asset base of assets and I just thought that was normal. Like come on, I’m just just doing what I gotta do and, and you know, just taking the good and trying to make it better and, and keep, keep rising. She’s like, nah, you, you, there is no, there is challenges in your day to day work life, but there is no mental challenge or thing pushing you back in the longer term journey. It’s too predictable. And whilst we aim for predictability in parts of business, it’s also like, it’s also bad for you.

Like there’s no like mental growth. And so she pushed me to go and say, “quit”. However, I had a real estate portfolio that helped and assisted with that. I had all these positives that I just talked about. Then my wife was doing fairly well in her career. So I wouldn’t say it was an uncomfortable decision, but that milestone became huge and that became huge because of the, the history and my wife’s support with that.

Ben Handler:

So massive milestone your wife to support you and help activate that change. And I guess, yeah, like I said earlier.The city for days to unpack your story and it’s an inspiring story. I mean it’s been an honor knowing you over the 14 months witnessing your, your business transforming. I mean, it’s a privilege and you obviously you’re very grateful and you’re a very humble guy. So thank you obviously for having this opportunity now to dive into your story. So thanks very much.

Arjun Paliwal:

Thank you.

Ben Handler:

Check out our journeys at investorkit.com.au today. Arjun is a really awesome entrepreneur. He’s done incredibly well. I mean, as I’ve said multiple times, seeing this guy’s business transform over 14 months has been remarkable. He’s a gun property investor himself.

Catching next week on the next show. See you there!

 

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Employee Mindset Vs Business Owner Mindset

Buyer's Agent Mindset

Let’s face it, the traditional education does not teach us to be business owners.

It’s no surprise it’s not the norm when you see someone who decides against getting a job, but rather starts their own business, not long after they leave school or university.

It all starts with your mindset.

Do you have an employee mindset or business owner mindset?

Why is it that the education system does not teach us about how to be entrepreneurs… how to create businesses that solve real problems?

When we grow up, the employee mindset feels like the safe option, and in some cases, the best option.

It’s not to say that being a business owner is better than being an employee, there is no right or wrong. The key difference is the mindset.

Both employees and business owners come with responsibility, however, more professional and personal growth can come from walking in the business owner’s shoes. Well, that was my experience having been an employee, compared to then running my own business.

1 key thing that stood out when I became a business owner was my level of awareness. Not just self-awareness, also the general awareness of people and situations around me. There seems to be a greater level of curiosity across all aspects of the business which leads to more questions.

I feel like it’s easier to get complacent when you are an employee. The mindset can be somewhat restricted, which can limit the true creativity and passion for someone. Whilst I believe everyone is a leader in their own capacity, true leaders are not free, until they are following their own heart and doing work that truly matters.

I believe that we are all placed on this planet to serve in some shape or form – we are all here to create and work out what is our true calling. Our career plays a major part of our life, outside of sleep.

Many people have an expectation of a life filled with joy and purpose, being financially free… how many people are really living this life and happy with their careers.

Why is it so many people end up in a career that they don’t enjoy?

If you are reading this and feel like you are a bit stuck with your career mindset i.e. you may be an employee looking to do something different, think about this:

  • What are your top 2 strengths?
  • Do you look forward going to work on Monday?
  • Do you feel like you are creating a real impact with what you are doing?
  • Do you feel inspired with what you are doing?

It’s never too late to design your own show, create your masterpiece, design your career from scratch. This is what life gives you, me, and everyone else. It’s up to you to choose what you paint, with what colors and brush.

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Why do people wait until the end of a year to plan their next year?

bracing motivational memes for buyer agent

Brace  yourselves! We are about to enter the time of the year, where we are inundated with motivational memes and posts of “new year, new me” posts.

Now, I don’t want to sound negative, but why do people wait until the end of a year to plan their next year?

I don’t get it. All successful businesses set their mission, have vision statements and action plans way in advance. They know what they’ll be doing 5, 10, and even 20 years into the future.

So, why don’t we do this at a personal level?

Imagine the difference if we had a personal mission, a vision statement for our life, and an action plan to make it all happen. What would your life look like?

The fact is, there’s no need to wait until any specific time of the year, any arbitrary date, or any other external influence. You can do it today.

All it takes is a simple decision.

But for many people making that decision is the hardest part, and that’s because FOMO kicks in and they think they’ll miss out on something better.

I’m here to tell you that nothing is better than the feeling of achieving your goals and being successful. I know this from personal experience.

And I have watched as other people I’ve helped finally get to live their best lives.

Don’t wait until 2020 to decide to live your best life… do it now.

My vision for 2020 is to help as many people as I can to careers they love and to build a business as a Buyer’s Agent.

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Being the masters of your own destiny

buyer agaent 2020 goals

So many people dream about designing their own lifestyle and being the masters of their own destiny… but sadly very few people ever do it.

Today, I want to introduce you to two people who have done it… Goose Mcgrath and Gabi Billing.

They both wanted to transition out of working 100-hour weeks. But changing careers can be overwhelming and scary.

So, they looked at the transferrable skills and life experience they had, and they used them to become Buyer’s Agents.

They realised quickly that there just wasn’t enough help for people to make sure they buy the right property. And because they made a mistake when they purchased their first property, they were passionate about helping other buyers to avoid making the same mistake.

When they first became Buyer’s Agents, they had aspirations of getting 10 clients in their first year. But in only 8 months… they signed up 54 clients!

Out of their desire to help other people has come the opportunity for them to create their own freedom and lifestyle.

They’ve combined their passion for property and their ability to help other people, and now they live a life they only ever dreamed of.

If you have a passion for property and a desire to help other people, then click on the link in the first comment.

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Do people need to have sales experience to  be a Buyer’s Agent?

master of your own destiny

I’m often asked whether people need to have sales experience to  be a Buyer’s Agent.

And they are often relieved when I tell them that Buyer’s Agents don’t need sales skills because they don’t sell anything. That’s because, the role is purely consultative, so we shouldn’t even be trying to sell anything at all. (Some of the best Buyer’s Agents I’ve known didn’t come from a sales background.)

That’s great news for people like me. Because I had never worked in sales when I started my career as a Buyer’s Agent.

When people look for a Buyer’s Agent, they aren’t looking for someone to sell them something. They want a professional who can research, negotiate, and do due diligence for them. And those skills are simple to learn.

But the best Buyer’s Agents I know all have one special skill that’s helped them to succeed. And that is, they were all highly trainable. They opened their minds to new ideas and ways of doing things.

And they were able to transfer skills they had from their previous careers. And when they combined those skills with the business and marketing skills, we gave them at the Buyer’s Agent Institute… their success was put on steroids.

If you’re open to new ideas, are highly trainable, and if you think you have what it takes to be a Buyer’s Agent… let’s have a chat and see If you’re a fit. Click on the link in the first comment.

Talk soon
Ben

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here

Fear is normal

people sales experience to be a Buyer’s Agent

You probably already know that one of the biggest limitations people have when it comes to success is fear.

But what most people don’t realise is… is normal.

The purpose of fear is to keep us safe. But the problem is… sometimes staying safe keeps us in an “uncomfortable” comfort zone.

And I say it’s uncomfortable because despite everything being comfortable… there is a monotony that happens and that leads to getting stuck in a rut. Or worse, stagnation.

You see, if you’re living a life where you don’t have anything to fear… then you are not moving towards fulfilling your potential. And that lies beyond your comfort zone.

When it comes to , many people give themselves excuses so they can avoid failure. But failure is also a normal part of life.

Imagine what would have happened if we let take over when we were learning to walk. Or when we were learning to ride a bicycle.

But we didn’t let fear hold us back then and we shouldn’t do it as adults either.

The fact is, every new experience comes with a healthy dose of fear. And it’s what you do in the face of that fear that matters most.

What opportunities have you missed because you let fear hold you back?

2020 is not only a new year, but it’s a new decade. Will you move forward in fear or will you feel the fear and do it anyway?

If you’re ready to succeed in the face of fear, then let’s have a chat about how I can help you do exactly that. To book in for a chat, click on the link in the first comment.

Have you considered turning buying property into a career?
To find out more, come and watch this free web-class:
Watch the Free Webclass Here